Computational Combustion
Computational Combustion

This volume rendering illustrates a turbulent methane-air flame, burning through regions with different proportions of fuel and air. Iso-surfaces of burning rate are coloured according to the local fuel-air ratio. The image shows how turbulence thickens and quenches the flame as the mixture passes beyond the lean flammability limit (blue mixture). Ed Richardson, University of Southampton ©

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Mixing of multiple fuels
Mixing of multiple fuels

Efficient mixing of fuel and air is considered as one of the key factors to achieve reduction of greenhouse gases and toxic pollutants. This very sophisticated numerical simulation, which visualizes of mixing process shows how the second fuel (in blue) interacts with the layers of first fuel and air (in red and yellow). Dong-hyuk Shin, University of Southampton ©

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Autofluorescent sample of wood veneer imaged by confocal microscopy
Autofluorescent sample of wood veneer imaged by confocal microscopy

This sample was imaged to collect a 3 channel autofluorescence image. The image represents a colour coded depth projection of the confocal image stack. Dave Johnston ©

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Hediste diversicolor
Hediste diversicolor

This image shows the burrow structures created by a small inter-tidal polychaete worm called Hediste diversicolor in mudflat sediment. These worms are both hunters and grazers and move through the sediment creating, what is now known to be, an extensive network of burrows. The volume and surface area of species burrows have important implications for both habitat and ecosystem stability through maintenance of important associated microbial communities and sediment nutrient cycling. Rachel Hale ©

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(NMBA) crystal
(NMBA) crystal

A reconstruction of the sample using a coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) method called ptychography and it is a first example of nonlinear CDI method. The reconstruction is shown in hue-saturation-value colour scheme, when colour intensity corresponds to electric field amplitude and hue corresponds to relative phase. The dark region in middle of the sample is glass that is showing a weak signal from a BBO crystal that was used for calibration. © Michal Odstril

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Lung periphery in 3D
Lung periphery in 3D

Lung sample, from a patient with excellent lung function, was scanned using µ-CT. Following scanning, it was later serially cut into 4µm slices and immunohistochemistry was used to positively stain and hence identify the airways (blue), blood vessels (red), lymphatics (yellow), macrophages (green) and mast cells (purple). Over many slices, the µ-CT image stack was segmented to reflect the staining information captured from the immunohistochemical staining of the lung tissue. Jonathan Ramsden ©

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Mouse organ blood vessels
Mouse organ blood vessels

False colour CT images showing the blood vasculature of specific organs in the mouse. A radiopaque dye was added to the blood of mice. The mice were then scanned by CT to visualise the blood vessels in the organs. The lungs are shown in blue, liver in red, and the kidneys in orange. The bones are shown in light yellow. The ability to analyse the blood vessels is important in the study of vascular disease. Stuart Lanham ©

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Osteoporotic Trabeculae
Osteoporotic Trabeculae

False colour CT images showing human trabecular bone degradation during osteoporosis. Colours represent bone density, ranging from purple (most dense), through blue, to gold (least dense). Trabecular bone begins to thin, the spacing between the bone starts to enlarge, and the bone density reduces (middle panel). At its most extreme form, osteoporotic bone has thin trabeculae containing little mineralised bone with a very weak structure. Stuart Lanham ©

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Crystals of NMBA
Crystals of NMBA

A computationally-reconstructed image of crystals of NMBA, which is an organic nonlinear material. Part of our research to develop this image reconstruction technique for looking at new nonlinear crystal materials. Important to note that it isn’t a microscope image - it’s actually a picture of the phase of the light coming through the crystal, reconstructed from measurement of hundreds of diffraction patterns. Michal Odstril ©

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A pollen grain on a daisy petal
A pollen grain on a daisy petal

The petal was dried and coated in metal before imaging with a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG SEM). The pollen grain is 15 micrometres in diameter. The FEG SEM produces very high resolution images. It can also be used at variable pressure to image uncoated and wet samples. Patricia Goggin ©

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3D Osteocyte
3D Osteocyte

a rendering of an image stack obtained from bone tissue. The osteocyte is a crucial cell for mechano-sensation and transmission of signals within bone. The many processes link between the blood vessels, bone marrow and other bone cells to regulate homeostasis. Understanding of the osteocyte structure may help in developing treatments for bone conditions such as osteoporosis. This image has been produced using Reconstruct software. Patricia Goggin ©

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Fluid Pathways through a Lymph Node
Fluid Pathways through a Lymph Node

The image is the result of a computational model which was created from selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) images of a murine lymph node. Inlet and outlet conditions were fixed and the permeability of the lymph node tissue to the fluid was defined using the greyscale of the SPIM images. The streamtubes in the image show the pathways of fluid as it passes through a lymph node. The grey areas show the locations of blood vessels. Laura Cooper ©

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Segmentation - human placental villi
Segmentation - human placental villi

Villi from human term placenta stained to show different tissue compartments (green = fetal blood vessels, red = connective tissue and blue the syncytiotrophoblast which form the barrier between the fetus and maternal blood which around the villi) Rohan Lewis ©

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Vessels in intermediate villi
Vessels in intermediate villi

A geometric model constructed based on segmentation of this image showing the syncytiotrophoblast in blue and the fetal vessels in green. Using these techniques, we hope to model maternal blood flow around the villi, fetal blood flow through the villi and then the transfer of nutrients and waste products between the two circulations. Rohan Lewis and BIU ©

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Fetal blood vessels
Fetal blood vessels

These vessels distribute blood from the major trunk arteries to the regions where nutrient exchange occurs. This image is particularly interesting as it shows an anastomosis between the two larger vessels (right hand side, about 3 o’clock) which has implications for blood flow. Anastomosis has previously been suspected but is difficult to demonstrate conclusively from 2D sections. Rohan Lewis and BIU ©

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Partial segmentation of cells
Partial segmentation of cells

Nuclei are shown in purple, capillary lumen in red, endothelial junctions in orange, pericytes in green, a stromal fibroblasts in turquoise and regions containing collagen in yellow. This work highlights the complexity and diversity of cells within the villi and their inter-relationships. Rohan Lewis and BIU ©

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Blood vessel
Blood vessel

The image shows the inside of a blood-vessel extracted from a human lung. The image was created by taking a tissue sample from a human lung, fixing it in a paraffin block and scanning it using the µCT at µVIS. The resultant data was segmented using ImageJ, post processed in Blender and rendered in Avizo. Lasse Wollatz ©

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Cortical Bone
Cortical Bone

Cortical bone which forms the outer shell of most bones contains a complex network of porous canals that facilitate the distribution of vascular structures. Bone cell survival depends on the proximity to these vessels. The image shows a murine tibia cortical bone cross-section and intracortical vessels generated for the study of bone vascular perfusion in osteoporosis. Blood vessels in red colour and distances to the nearest blood vessel colour mapped on bone tissue. Juan Nunez ©

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Trabecular thickness of bone
Trabecular thickness of bone

Trabecular thickness of normal v/s osteoporotic bone. Cross section of a healthy (left) and osteoporotic (right) femoral head, I have colour coded the thickness of the trabecular bone. Gry Hulsart Billstrom ©

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Computational biophysics of the skin
Computational biophysics of the skin

Strain distributions in a human skin sample subject to in-plane compression which results in the formation of temporary wrinkles (red indicate tensile strains while other colours indicate compressive strains). These are the results of finite element simulations. These types of test are routinely used by cosmetic and some pharmaceutical companies to assess the efficacy of their products on the skin.Georges Limbert ©

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Computational biophysics of the skin
Computational biophysics of the skin

Strain distributions in a human skin sample subject to in-plane compression which results in the formation of temporary wrinkles (red indicate tensile strains while other colours indicate compressive strains). These are the results of finite element simulations. These types of test are routinely used by cosmetic and some pharmaceutical companies to assess the efficacy of their products on the skin.Georges Limbert ©

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Computational biophysics of the skin
Computational biophysics of the skin

Strain distributions in a human skin sample subject to in-plane compression which results in the formation of temporary wrinkles (red indicate tensile strains while other colours indicate compressive strains). These are the results of finite element simulations. These types of test are routinely used by cosmetic and some pharmaceutical companies to assess the efficacy of their products on the skin.Georges Limbert ©

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